Quantitative Tightening and Next Eleven economies

Major concerns were raised with respect to the prospect of the exit strategy from Quantitative Easing. However, most of these concerns were related to US and the other developed economies which implemented this monetary policy. Less attention has been given the impact on emerging economies.

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Quantitative Easing is not Neutral

The recent statements by Eugene Fama, Nobel Laureate in Economics (by the way, the actual title is Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel), on the fact that Quantitative Easing is neutral have puzzled many. According to him, “QE doesn’t do much”. When analyzed from the perspective of current debates in macroeconomics, this view is rather hard to be categorized, since no serious approach I know of really thinks about QE in these terms.

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Quantitative Easing: The Exit Strategy

            The Fed has recently announced that it will renounce to Quantitative Easing policy. Alan Blinder has a very interesting material that explains pretty well the rationales for why has the FED chosen this approach, how was implemented and what are the exit strategies.

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Liquidity Trap Criticism

Quite surprisingly, although there is so much talk about the liquidity trap and its close concept, the zero lower bound (see the definition of liquidity trap), the criticism of these concepts is rather thin. This is even more puzzling since the liquidity trap concept is known for a long time, ever since Keynes proposed it (Rhodes did not find any mention of it in the work By Keynes).

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Does Quantitative Easing Cause Inflation?

Following the effects of the last financial crisis, as the nominal interest rate hit the zero lower bound, the central banks in United States, Euro Area and United Kingdom (to be more precise, it was the Bank of Japan that experienced this approach first) have started to implement a rather extreme form of unconventional monetary policy which became known as the Quantitative Easing.

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